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Passion Fruit Mousse

By on Dec 22, 2016 in Blog Posts, Recipes | 0 comments

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The passion fruit vine has switching into high gear. I am collecting about 15 passionfruit a day at the moment. I’ve been spending lazy, dreamy days thinking up recipes that will benefit from the tangy, sharpness of the fruit. Perhaps I could update Mum’s Lemon Mousse recipe from the seventies:

I’m sitting on the third from top step of the staircase. It’s long and straight with only a light grey shadow on the wall next to me where I wrote: “Phil was here”. Phil is my sister and the unlucky recipient of the ensuing punishment. I’d been send to bed at the usual time but it feels unfair on three counts. First: Its summer in Yorkshire and although late in the evening, it’s still daylight outside. My thin cotton curtains, printed with yellow daisies, do a poor job of keeping the light out.

Second: The laughter and voices of the adults attending one of Mum’s dinner parties below, drift up the stairs. It is alluring because it’s too loud to ignore their hilarity and too soft for me to make out any actual words. Over the course of the last few minutes (feels like hours) I have drifted, so slowly, you probably couldn’t see me move. First I crawled on hands and knees from my bedroom to the stairs. Now quietly, quietly I bum-shuffle down first one, then two and now three stairs. By the end of the evening I will be two thirds of the way down and both Mum and Dad will do a fine job of pretending they don’t see me there. They know the third, and most important reason: Mum’s Lemon Mousse (its re-incarnation as passion fruit mousse is many years in the future).

Mum’s mousse (and she will go on to make it on high days and holidays for years to come, cheating by using lemon jelly powder when its just family) is a triumph in  freedom from concern about ingredients. Worries about children and raw eggs are all terrors of the future. Living on a farm means that the ‘green-top’ milk is almost certainly unpasteurised. All I know is that the mousse is a thing of wonder and beauty. Sweet, tart, so light I can barely feel it on my lips. The palest of creamy yellow. My mouth waters and I imagine how I will use the broad flat serving spoon with the knobbly handle to slurp up airy mouthfuls before anyone else wakes in the morning.

Forty odd years later I find that Mum is remarkably willing to give up the recipe for such an ambrosial dessert and, even more surprising and delicious, the recipe can easily be modified for passion fruit. Here goes:

Print Recipe
Passion Fruit Mousse
Adapted from Mum's famous lemon mousse. It takes more bowls than I like, but its worth it for special occasions.
Course Dessert
Prep Time 30 mins
Passive Time 4 - 6 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Dessert
Prep Time 30 mins
Passive Time 4 - 6 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Cut open the passion fruit and remove the pulp (I used a little serrated grapefruit spoon but any will do). Put it straight into the bowl of the food processor.
  2. Whizz (technical term) the pulp for about 30 seconds - just enough to loosen the pulp from the seeds. Sieve the juice into a small bowl and discard the seeds.
  3. Sprinkle the gelatine over the passionfruit juice and allow to stand for five minutes. You can boil a kettle of water at the same time.
  4. Pour the boiling water into a larger bowl and then set the smaller bowl of passionfruit juice and gelatine into it. Stir until the gelatine has dissolved. Put the gelatine mixture into the fridge to cool.
  5. Add the sugar to the egg yolks and beat them until they are thick and creamy.
  6. Add the gelatine mixture to the egg yolks and put it back into the fridge.
  7. Whip the cream in a large bowl to soft peaks (I don't bother washing the beater attachments from the eggs but make sure that after you have whipped the cream you give them a good wash with detergent as the fat will stop the whites from getting nice and fluffy).
  8. Beat the egg whites until they are stiff and a bit shiny.
  9. Add the cream to passionfruit mixture and stir carefully (if you are over zealous here you will remove all the air you have just put into everything).
  10. Add a third of the egg whites and stir in. Then fold in he remaining egg whites (I'm not sure why you have to do it in two different ways but I do it anyway).
  11. Put it in the fridge until set: four to six hours.
Recipe Notes

As you can see the eggs in recipe are not cooked which I know will leave the prudish amongst us aghast. You might want to avoid feeding this to the infirm if you are worried about the source of your eggs.


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